Cardiology

Early rhythm control key in A-fib and heart failure

(HealthDay)—For patients with atrial fibrillation and signs and symptoms of heart failure, early rhythm control (ERC) therapy reduces cardiovascular events, according to a study published online July 30 in Circulation to ...

Cardiology

Ticagrelor, prasugrel compared in ACS treated with PCI

(HealthDay)—For patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a postrandomization subgroup analysis suggests that a prasugrel-based strategy is superior to ...

Cardiology

Want to treat heart attacks faster? There's an app for that

Patients suffering a heart attack received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a procedure to clear blocked arteries in the heart, an average of 10 minutes faster after clinicians and paramedics began using an app to ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19 in combination with hemorrhagic stroke doubles death risk

COVID-19 and hemorrhagic stroke are a deadly combination, increasing the risk of death up to 2.4 times among patients who have this pairing compared to those who only had hemorrhagic strokes, according to a nationwide study ...

Cardiology

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities

The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals ...

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Acute coronary syndrome

An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a set of signs and symptoms (syndrome) related to the heart. ACS is compatible with a diagnosis of acute myocardial ischemia, but it is not pathognomonic.

The sub-types of acute coronary syndrome include unstable angina (UA, not associated with heart muscle damage), and two forms of myocardial infarction (MI, heart attack), in which heart muscle is damaged. These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA