Oncology & Cancer

Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a deadly cancer, killing patients within a year. CSHL Professor Christopher Vakoc and his former postdoc Timothy Somerville discovered how pancreatic cells lose their identity, acquire ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study tracks genomics of lung tumor behavior

A study by Vanderbilt researchers has identified genomic alterations in early stage adenocarcinomas of the lung that may indicate whether the lesions develop into aggressive tumors.

Radiology & Imaging

PET/CT plays role in lung adenocarcinoma management

According to an article published ahead-of-print in the February 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG PET) can be used to predict the histopathologic subtypes and growth patterns ...

Oncology & Cancer

Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer

Cancer is relentless and resilient. When a drug blocks a cancer cell's main survival pathway, the cell avoids the obstacle by taking different pathways or detours to save itself. This tactic is called "developing resistance," ...

Oncology & Cancer

Nerves could be key to pancreatic cancer spread

A couple of molecules that nerve cells use to grow during development could help explain why the most common pancreatic cancers are so difficult to contain and for patients to survive, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel ...

Medical research

Pancreatic cancer clue

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a predisposing condition for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common and deadly cancer of the pancreas. However, the link between CP and PDAC is not known.

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Adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinoma is a cancer originating in glandular tissue. This tissue is also part of a larger tissue category known as epithelial. Epithelial tissue includes skin, glands and a variety of other tissue that lines the cavities and organs of the body. Epithelium is derived embryologically from ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. To be classified as adenocarcinoma, the cells do not necessarily need to be part of a gland, as long as they have secretory properties. This form of carcinoma can occur in some higher mammals, including humans. Well differentiated adenocarcinomas tend to resemble the glandular tissue that they are derived from, while poorly differentiated may not. By staining the cells from a biopsy, a pathologist will determine whether the tumor is an adenocarcinoma or some other type of cancer. Adenocarcinomas can arise in many tissues of the body due to the ubiquitous nature of glands within the body. While each gland may not be secreting the same substance, as long as there is an exocrine function to the cell, it is considered glandular and its malignant form is therefore named adenocarcinoma. Endocrine gland tumors, such as a VIPoma, an insulinoma, a pheochromocytoma, etc, are typically not referred to as adenocarcinomas, but rather, are often called neuroendocrine tumors. If the glandular tissue is abnormal, but benign, it is said to be an adenoma. Benign adenomas typically do not invade other tissue and rarely metastasize. Malignant adenocarcinomas invade other tissues and often metastasize given enough time to do so.

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