Medical research

Peering into the genome of brain tumor

Researchers at Osaka University have developed a computer method that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and machine learning to rapidly forecast genetic mutations in glioma tumors, which occur in the brain or spine. The ...

Oncology & Cancer

New software tool uses AI to help doctors identify cancer cells

UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images—giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

Medical research

Patient diaries reveal propensity for epileptic seizures

A researcher at Rice University's Brown School of Engineering and an alumna of her lab have the first validation of their program to assess the risk of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

Medications

Metabolic syndrome: New use for an old drug

New drugs can be developed from old ones. This revolutionary pharmacological approach was confirmed by a study published today in Nature Communications that was conducted by two major research centers of the University of ...

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Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

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