Neuroscience

How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression

Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. Targeting those pathways via deep brain stimulation may stymie aggression ...

Neuroscience

Why some people are more prone to anxiety

Anxiety-prone people can blame serotonin cleanup proteins gone awry in their amygdala, according to research in marmosets recently published in JNeurosci. Targeting the amygdala with anti-anxiety medication could provide ...

Medical research

Newly discovered memory process influences decision-making

Learned connections between stimuli and reward—like the positive emotions associated with popular brands—have a powerful influence over our future decisions. Scientists have started to discover why.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers discover new pathways in brain's amygdala

Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are pioneering an innovative brain study that sheds light on how the amygdala portion of the brain functions and could contribute to a better understanding of post-traumatic ...

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Amygdala

The amygdalae ( /əˈmɪɡdəliː/; singular: amygdala; also corpus amygdaloideum; Latin, from Greek αμυγδαλή, amygdalē, 'almond', 'tonsil', listed in the Gray's Anatomy as the nucleus amygdalæ) are almond-shaped groups of nuclei located deep within the medial temporal lobes of the brain in complex vertebrates, including humans. Shown in research to perform a primary role in the processing and memory of emotional reactions, the amygdalae are considered part of the limbic system.

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