Medications

New drug mimics benefits of ketamine for depression

A new small-molecule drug produced a rapid antidepressant response similar to that of ketamine when tested in mice, a new Yale-led study published April 16 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows.

Surgery

Peripheral nerve block may cut opioid use after amputation

(HealthDay)—Peripheral nerve blockade with regular local anesthetic and liposomal bupivacaine is associated with lower oral morphine equivalent (OME) use at 72 hours after major lower extremity amputation (MLEA), according ...

Cardiology

Volatile anesthetics do not reduce deaths in elective CABG

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), there is no significant difference in deaths at one year with anesthesia with a volatile agent versus total intravenous anesthesia, according ...

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Anesthetic

An anesthetic (or anaesthetic, see spelling differences) is a drug that causes anesthesia—reversible loss of sensation. They contrast with analgesics (painkillers), which relieve pain without eliminating sensation. These drugs are generally administered to facilitate surgery. A wide variety of drugs are used in modern anesthetic practice. Many are rarely used outside of anesthesia, although others are used commonly by all disciplines. Anesthetics are categorized into two classes: general anesthetics, which cause a reversible loss of consciousness, and local anesthetics, which cause a reversible loss of sensation for a limited region of the body while maintaining consciousness. Combinations of anesthetics are sometimes used for their synergistic and additive therapeutic effects. Adverse effects, however, may also be increased.

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