Neuroscience

Neurosurgeon explains the difference in brain aneurysms

Each year, nearly half a million people worldwide die from brain aneurysms. In the U.S., an estimated 6.7 million people have an unruptured brain aneurysm, which means about 1 in 50 people might have one.

Cardiology

The aorta categorized as an independent organ for the first time

The aorta, also known as the main artery, is now categorized as an independent human organ. This has now been established in the guidelines for aortic surgical treatments of the European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery ...

Health

The three heart health tests you may not know you need

Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for men and women in the United States. Eating a healthy diet and exercising help keep the heart healthy along with regular checkups with a doctor. While doctors routinely check blood ...

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Aneurysm

An aneurysm or aneurism (from Ancient Greek: ἀνεύρυσμα - aneurusma "dilation", from ἀνευρύνειν - aneurunein "to dilate") is a localized, blood-filled balloon-like bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. Aneurysms can commonly occur in arteries at the base of the brain (the circle of Willis) and an aortic aneurysm occurs in the main artery carrying blood from the left ventricle of the heart. When the size of an aneurysm increases, there is a significant risk of rupture, resulting in severe hemorrhage, other complications or death. Aneurysms can be hereditary or caused by disease, both of which cause the wall of the blood vessel to weaken.

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