Cardiology

USPSTF addresses screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations on screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) vary with sex, age, smoking status, and family history. These recommendations form the basis ...

Radiology & Imaging

AI tool helps radiologists detect brain aneurysms

Doctors could soon get some help from an artificial intelligence tool when diagnosing brain aneurysms—bulges in blood vessels in the brain that can leak or burst open, potentially leading to stroke, brain damage or death.

Cardiology

Emphysema may raise risk of ruptured aneurysms

When a weakened artery wall balloons or bulges, it's called an aneurysm. For people with emphysema, the risk of that aneurysm rupturing is much higher than for those without the lung condition, new research suggests.

Cardiology

Certain antibiotics tied to deadly heart vessel tears: FDA

(HealthDay)—Patients should avoid a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolone due to an increased risk of heart vessel tears associated with their use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned.

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Aneurysm

An aneurysm or aneurism (from Ancient Greek: ἀνεύρυσμα - aneurusma "dilation", from ἀνευρύνειν - aneurunein "to dilate") is a localized, blood-filled balloon-like bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. Aneurysms can commonly occur in arteries at the base of the brain (the circle of Willis) and an aortic aneurysm occurs in the main artery carrying blood from the left ventricle of the heart. When the size of an aneurysm increases, there is a significant risk of rupture, resulting in severe hemorrhage, other complications or death. Aneurysms can be hereditary or caused by disease, both of which cause the wall of the blood vessel to weaken.

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