Medical research

Games as therapy for people with language loss

In a year when many of us worked virtually, a small group gathered online with the common goal of making speech and language therapy more accessible—while having some fun along the way. Their project, called Aphasia Games ...

Neuroscience

Peer-befriending may help people with aphasia

A new study led by City, University of London suggests that peer-befriending when stroke patients with aphasia are discharged from hospital and active care is withdrawn may help reduce depressive symptoms.

Cardiology

Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke.

Neuroscience

Answering the question 'Will I get better?'

Speech pathologists lack a consistent approach to communicating post-stroke recovery information to patients, a University of Queensland study has found.

Neuroscience

'Reading' with aphasia is easier than 'running'

Neurolinguists from HSE University have confirmed experimentally that for people with aphasia, it is easier to retrieve verbs describing situations with several participants (such as 'someone is doing something'), although ...

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Aphasia

Aphasia ( /əˈfeɪʒə/ or /əˈfeɪziə/) is an impairment of language ability. This class of language disorder ranges from having difficulty remembering words to being completely unable to speak, read, or write.

Aphasia disorders usually develop quickly as a result of head injury or stroke, but can develop slowly from a brain tumor, infection, or dementia, or can be a learning disability such as dysnomia.

The area and extent of brain damage determine the type of aphasia and its symptoms. Aphasia types include Broca's aphasia, non-fluent aphasia, motor aphasia, expressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, global aphasia and many others (see Category:Aphasias).

Medical evaluations for the disorder range from clinical screenings by a neurologist to extensive tests by a language pathologist.

Most aphasia patients can recover some or most skills by working with a speech and language therapist. This rehabilitation can take two or more years and is most effective when begun quickly. Only a small minority will recover without therapy, such as those suffering a mini-stroke. Patients with a learning-disorder aphasia such as dysnomia can learn coping skills, but cannot recover abilities that are congenitally limited.

Improvement varies widely, depending on the aphasia's cause, type, and severity. Recovery also depends on the patient's age, health, motivation, handedness, and educational level.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA