Surgery

Appendectomy: What to know

Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that projects from your colon on the lower right side of your abdomen.

Surgery

Antibiotics as the primary treatment for mild appendicitis

Using antibiotics as the primary treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase the risk for complications at least in the first year. But other considerations must also be taken into account, say researchers.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study considers antibiotics-first approach to appendicitis

(HealthDay)—An antibiotics-first approach could be considered for specific patients with appendicitis, according to a case vignette published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Pediatrics

Lowering WBC criteria lowers negative appendectomy rate

(HealthDay)—Reducing the threshold of leukocytosis as a criterion for appendicitis to 8,000 to 9,000 white blood cells (WBCs) per µL reduces the rates of negative appendectomy, according to a study published online Dec. ...

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Appendectomy

An appendectomy (sometimes called appendisectomy or appendicectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. This procedure is normally performed as an emergency procedure, when the patient is suffering from acute appendicitis. In the absence of surgical facilities, intravenous antibiotics are used to delay or avoid the onset of sepsis; it is now recognized that many cases will resolve when treated perioperatively. In some cases the appendicitis resolves completely; more often, an inflammatory mass forms around the appendix, causing transruptural flotation. This is a relative contraindication to surgery.

Appendectomy may be performed laparoscopically (this is called minimally invasive surgery) or as an open operation. Laparoscopy is often used if the diagnosis is in doubt, or if it is desirable to hide the scars in the umbilicus or in the pubic hair line. Recovery may be a little quicker with laparoscopic surgery; the procedure is more expensive and resource-intensive than open surgery and generally takes a little longer, with the (low in most patients) additional risks associated with pneumoperitoneum (inflating the abdomen with gas). Advanced pelvic sepsis occasionally requires a lower midline laparotomy.

There have been some cases of auto-appendectomies, i.e. operating on yourself. One was performed by Dr Kane in 1921, but the operation was completed by his assistants. Another case is Leonid Rogozov who had to perform the operation on himself as he was the only surgeon on a remote Antarctic base.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA