Neuroscience

Advances in deep brain stimulation could lead to new treatments

A new paper published in Nature Reviews Neurology suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Artificial intelligence approach optimizes embryo selection for IVF

A new artificial intelligence approach by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators can identify with a great degree of accuracy whether a 5-day-old, in vitro fertilized human embryo has a high potential to progress to a successful ...

Autism spectrum disorders

Digital intervention ups socialization in children with autism

(HealthDay)—An artificial intelligence-driven wearable behavioral intervention, Superpower Glass, can improve social outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published online March ...

Neuroscience

Motion recognition tech assists epilepsy diagnosis

Motion recognition technology is being used to help neurologists in the study of patients' behaviour during seizures, to provide clues on the sub-type of epilepsy the patient has and identify unusual seizure movements that ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers get humans to think like computers

Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school busses. People aren't supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but ...

Health

Can a virtual assistant keep you healthy?

Artificial intelligence will take its first step into the healthy lifestyle sector as UniSA's new virtual assistant, 'Paola', is piloted in a world-first Mediterranean lifestyle and physical activity study this week.

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Artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the intelligence of machines and the branch of computer science which aims to create it. Major AI textbooks define the field as "the study and design of intelligent agents," where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions which maximize its chances of success. John McCarthy, who coined the term in 1956, defines it as "the science and engineering of making intelligent machines."

The field was founded on the claim that a central property of human beings, intelligence—the sapience of Homo sapiens—can be so precisely described that it can be simulated by a machine. This raises philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and limits of scientific hubris, issues which have been addressed by myth, fiction and philosophy since antiquity. Artificial intelligence has been the subject of breathtaking optimism, has suffered stunning setbacks and, today, has become an essential part of the technology industry, providing the heavy lifting for many of the most difficult problems in computer science.

AI research is highly technical and specialized, so much so that some critics decry the "fragmentation" of the field. Subfields of AI are organized around particular problems, the application of particular tools and around longstanding theoretical differences of opinion. The central problems of AI include such traits as reasoning, knowledge, planning, learning, communication, perception and the ability to move and manipulate objects. General intelligence (or "strong AI") is still a long-term goal of (some) research, while many researchers no longer believe that this is possible.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA