Medications

Dupilumab cuts exacerbations in late-onset asthma

(HealthDay)—Dupilumab is associated with significantly reduced severe exacerbation rates in patients with late-onset asthma with or without fixed airway obstruction, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic ...

Immunology

New treatment approach for allergic asthma

A potential new treatment for asthma that works by targeting the cause of the disease, rather than just masking its symptoms, has been revealed in a study published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.

Immunology

Summer is tough for asthma sufferers

(HealthDay)—Summertime can bring asthma sufferers a lot of misery, but lung experts say watching for warning signs of breathing trouble can guard against serious complications.

Immunology

Asthma answer may not be steroids for women

For women depending on steroids to treat severe asthma, their body's estrogen may not only be preventing the treatment from working effectively, but making the asthma worse, according to a recent Western study.

Immunology

Confidence in asthma inhaler technique doesn't match actual skills

Many children with asthma think they are using their asthma inhaler medications correctly when they are not. This makes it very difficult to keep their asthma under control. A new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, ...

Immunology

The lungs never forget: Specialised T-cells remember allergens

According to a current study of the Medical University Vienna, specialised T memory lymphocytes in the lungs that react to inhaled allergens, cause attacks of allergic asthma. These T-helper 2-tissue resident memory cells, ...

page 1 from 23

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the lungs in which the airways (bronchi) are reversibly narrowed. Asthma affects 7% of the population, and 300 million worldwide. During attacks (exacerbations), the smooth muscle cells in the bronchi constrict, and the airways become inflamed and swollen. Breathing becomes difficult, and asthma causes 4,000 deaths a year in the U.S. Attacks can be prevented by avoiding triggering factors and by drug treatment. Drugs are used for acute attacks, commonly inhaled β2-agonists. In more serious cases, drugs are used for long-term prevention, starting with inhaled corticosteroids, and then long-acting β2-agonists if necessary. Leukotriene antagonists are less effective than corticosteroids but have no side effects. Monoclonal antibodies such as mepolizumab and omalizumab are sometimes effective. Prognosis is good with treatment.

In contrast to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic bronchitis, the inflammation of asthma is reversible. In contrast to emphysema, asthma affects the bronchi, not the alveoli.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute defines asthma as a common chronic disorder of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (bronchospasm), and an underlying inflammation.

Public attention in the developed world has recently focused on asthma because of its rapidly increasing prevalence, affecting up to one in four urban children.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA