Neuroscience

People with autism have a more symmetrical brain

Do people with autism have differently organized brains? A large-scale MRI study, published in Nature Communications, reports fewer differences between the right and left hemispheres in people with autism spectrum disorder. ...

Surgery

Facial asymmetry increases with age

Asymmetry between the two sides of the face increases steadily with aging—a finding with important implications for facial rejuvenation and reconstructive procedures, reports a study in the November issue of Plastic and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study reveals vision's role in vowel perception

For all talkers, except perhaps the very best ventriloquists, the production of speech is accompanied by visible facial movements. Because speech is more than just sound, researchers set out to ascertain the exact visual ...

Neuroscience

Lopsided ear function can lead to lopsided brain development

Left-right differences in ear function have been found to lead to asymmetric brain development that affects the preferred direction of turning movement in mice. In a multi-national study publishing 13 March in the open access ...

Neuroscience

Decoding biological asymmetry

Our bodies, our behaviour, but also our brains are anything other than symmetrical. And that seems to be an important factor in the seamless functioning of our thought, speech and motor faculties. Researchers at the Max Planck ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Cervical spine range of motion may affect postural stability

(HealthDay)—In adults with neck pain, those with asymmetry in the range of motion (ROM) of the upper cervical spine (UCS) have increased postural sway compared with those with symmetry, but postural function does not differ ...

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Asymmetry

Asymmetry is the absence of, or a violation of, a symmetry.

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