Neuroscience

Brain has natural noise-cancelling circuit

To ensure that a mouse hears the sounds of an approaching cat better than it hears the sounds its own footsteps make, the mouse's brain has a built-in noise-cancelling circuit.

Neuroscience

Visual cues amplify sound

Looking at someone's lips is good for listening in noisy environments because it helps our brains amplify the sounds we're hearing in time with what we're seeing, finds a new UCL-led study.

Neuroscience

Use it or lose it

An Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich study reveals that sound-evoked activity of neurons in the auditory system of the mouse increases the thickness of their myelin sheaths - and enhances the speed of signal transmission ...

Neuroscience

Transcriptional control of sound discrimination

Filippo Rijli and his team at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research have identified two genes that control sound discrimination in the brain. The Hox2 transcription factors act in the mouse brain stem and ...

page 1 from 4