Psychology & Psychiatry

Virtual therapy: The 'new normal' after COVID-19

Once the COVID-19 pandemic is over, a lot of things will go back to normal. We'll stop wearing masks. We'll crowd into restaurants. We'll walk whatever direction we want to down grocery store aisles. But some changes that ...

Health

Quinn on Nutrition: ABCs of good-for-you foods

I recently got together with a group of friends (at a socially accepted distance). One of them suggested we go through the alphabet and name all the things for which we are thankful. It did my heart good to hear the array ...

Health

Sweet, healthier treats from your stand mixer

(HealthDay)—Are you in the mood to mix up something sinful, but don't want to wreck your healthy eating plans? Use a stand mixer to do the heavy blending and whipping for three better-for-you treats.

Health

Super berries power up porridge

As the popularity of porridge continues to rise, the addition of a super berry could make it the ultimate new power breakfast for health-conscious, gluten-intolerant consumers.

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Berry

The botanical definition of a berry is a fleshy fruit produced from a single ovary. Grapes are an example. The berry is the most common type of fleshy fruit in which the entire ovary wall ripens into an edible pericarp. They may have one or more carpels with a thin covering and fleshy interiors. The seeds are usually embedded in the flesh of the ovary. A plant that bears berries is said to be bacciferous. Many species of plants produce fruit that are similar to berries, but not actually berries, and these are said to be baccate.

In everyday English, "berry" is a term for any small edible fruit. These "berries" are usually juicy, round or semi-oblong, brightly coloured, sweet or sour, and do not have a stone or pit, although many seeds may be present.

Many berries, such as the tomato, are edible, but others in the same family, such as the fruits of the deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) and the fruits of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) are poisonous to humans. Some berries, such as Capsicum, have space rather than pulp around their seeds.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA