Neuroscience

A precise look at Alzheimer's proteins

A substance known as amyloid beta protein gets a lot of attention from scientists. Beta amyloid, as it's also called, is a normal brain protein found in everyone, but for an unknown reason it gunks up in the brains of patients ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

New Alzheimer therapy passes another important test

The Alzheimer drug candidate PRI-002 developed at Forschungszentrum J├╝lich has successfully completed Phase I of clinical research involving healthy volunteers. When administered daily over a period of four weeks, the active ...

Neuroscience

Do microglia hold the key to stop Alzheimer's disease?

A Leuven research team led by Prof. Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven, UK DRI) studied how specialized brain cells called microglia respond to the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, a feature typical of Alzheimer's. ...

Neuroscience

How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease

Zebrafish, in contrast to humans, have outstanding regenerative capacities: If brain cells are lost due to illness or injury, they will easily regrow from so-called progenitor cells. With sophisticated methods, researchers ...

Medical research

A possible blood test for early-stage Alzheimer's disease

A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across South Korea has developed a possible blood test to detect the early stages of Alzheimer's disease in patients who have yet to exhibit symptoms. In ...

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Beta amyloid

Amyloid beta (Aβ or Abeta) is a peptide of 39–43 amino acids that appear to be the main constituent of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Similar plaques appear in some variants of Lewy body dementia and in inclusion body myositis, a muscle disease. Aβ also forms aggregates coating cerebral blood vessels in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. These plaques are composed of a tangle of regularly ordered fibrillar aggregates called amyloid fibers, a protein fold shared by other peptides such as prions associated with protein misfolding diseases. Research on laboratory rats suggest that the two-molecule, soluble form of the peptide is a causative agent in the development of Alzheimer's and that the two-molecule form is the smallest synaptotoxic species of soluble amyloid beta oligomer

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