Neuroscience

Why bilinguals may have a memory advantage—new research

Think about being in a conversation with your best friend or partner. How often do you finish each other's words and sentences? How do you know what they are going to say before they have said it? We like to think it is romantic ...

Medical research

Is the language you speak tied to outcome after stroke?

Studies have shown that Mexican Americans have worse outcomes after a stroke than non-Hispanic white Americans. A new study looks at whether the language Mexican American people speak is linked to how well they recover after ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Bilingualism comes naturally to our brains, new study shows

The brain uses a shared mechanism for combining words from a single language and for combining words from two different languages, a team of neuroscientists has discovered. Its findings indicate that language switching is ...

Autism spectrum disorders

Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children

Affecting more than one in a hundred children, autism spectrum disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders. It has a particular impact on social interaction, including difficulties in understanding other ...

Pediatrics

Meta-analysis shows children prefer people who speak like them

Research shows that children prefer to befriend, listen to, and imitate people who speak similarly to them. While most of this research has been conducted on monolingual (speaking only one language) children from Western ...

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Multilingualism

Multilingualism is the act of using, or promoting the use of, multiple languages, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. Multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population. Multilingualism is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness. Thanks to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is getting more and more frequent, and triggering therefore the need to acquire more and more languages.

People who speak more than one language are also called polyglots.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA