Obstetrics & gynaecology

Pregnant smokers at higher risk for gestational diabetes

Smoking during pregnancy is one of the most significant risk factors for poor pregnancy outcomes. In the United States, 10.7 percent of all women smoke during their pregnancy or are exposed to secondhand smoke. Consequently, ...

Health

Pot while pregnant: medicine doctors urge caution

Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study from a team of ...

Surgery

Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects

Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy. That's according ...

Immunology

Birth weight linked to childhood allergies

The more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the greater the risk of childhood food allergies and eczema, according to South Australian researchers.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Study seeks to guide maternal weight gain in twin pregnancies

An old adage urges pregnant women to "eat for two." So with twins, is it "eat for three?" While that is likely bad advice, when it comes to twin pregnancies, clinicians don't have firm guidelines for ideal weight gain due ...

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Birth mass

Birth mass is the mass of a baby at its birth. It has direct links with the gestational age at which the child was born and can be estimated during the pregnancy by measuring fundal height. A baby born within the normal range of mass for that gestational age is known as appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Those born above or below that range have often had an unusual rate of development – this often indicates complications with the pregnancy that may affect the baby or its mother. The incidence of birth mass being outside of the AGA is influenced by the parents in numerous ways, including:

There have been numerous studies that have attempted, with varying degrees of success, to show links between birth mass and later-life conditions, including diabetes, obesity, tobacco smoking and intelligence.

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