Health

Healthy, delicious cooking with summer's peaches, plums

(HealthDay)—Sweet plums and peaches are great on their own, a good source of potassium and a sweet low-cal snack with only 40 calories each. But you can also use them as the foundation of dishes perfect for summer entertaining.

Health

A tasty way to get your omega-3s

(HealthDay)—It's well known that omega-3 fatty acids, or omega-3s for short, are important anti-inflammatory nutrients that, along with many other functions, reduce heart disease risk. What's unclear is whether you can ...

Health

No-cook summer recipes featuring cool, sweet fruit

(HealthDay)—Sweet summer fruits make a luscious ending to a meal, but there's no reason to limit them to dessert. Here are three fruity no-cook dishes that will please every palate.

Health

5 easy ways to cut back your salt intake

(HealthDay)—About two-thirds of Americans have taken steps to cut back on salt, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation.

Health

Say yes to yummy, healthy yogurt

(HealthDay)—Creamy and rich, yogurt is a versatile dairy food that can be turned into delicious meals.

Health

Melons are powerhouses in taste, nutrition

(HealthDay)—If you're looking for a tasty way to hydrate in warm weather, a juicy melon is the ticket. Melons are low-calorie, high-water content foods that also provide high doses of certain vitamins, minerals and important ...

Health

A celebration salad fit for a queen or king

(HealthDay)—When you want to create a festive celebration without a fat and calorie overload, a seafood-based salad is the perfect choice. To step up the extravagance, make it with crabmeat.

Health

How to spice up your spring salad

(HealthDay)—You already know that iceberg lettuce is low on taste and nutrients, but even the best greens can use a punch of flavor to keep your taste buds interested. Here are two ways to enjoy spring greens.

Health

Eat spicy, live longer? Study says yes

Like a fiery finish to dinner? Then you'll be glad to know that a recent study suggests people who eat hot, spicy foods regularly may live longer.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

FDA: Imported spices have double salmonella risk

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that almost 7 percent of imported spices over a three-year period were contaminated with salmonella.

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