Obstetrics & gynaecology

Mothers with higher quality diets have slimmer, leaner babies

Obesity is a growing problem among toddlers, children and adolescents in the United States. Gaining weight and fat mass rapidly during the first six months of life is one risk factor that can lead to obesity in children.

Radiology & Imaging

Obesity linked with differences in form and structure of the brain

Researchers using sophisticated MRI technology have found that higher levels of body fat are associated with differences in the brain's form and structure, including smaller volumes of gray matter, according to a study published ...

Medical research

Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Fat, biologically speaking, is not a bad thing. Fatty acids—the molecular building blocks for body fat—are crucial to the formation of cell walls and for storing energy in the form of glycerolipids. Now, Rockefeller scientists ...

Medical research

Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day

Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds.

Overweight & Obesity

Sitting in front of the TV puts kids in the obesity hotseat

The simple act of switching on the TV for some downtime could be making a bigger contribution to childhood obesity than we realise, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

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Adipose tissue

In histology, adipose tissue or body fat or just fat is loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes. Adipose tissue is derived from lipoblasts. Its main role is to store energy in the form of fat, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Obesity or being overweight in humans and most animals does not depend on body weight but on the amount of body fat—specifically, adipose tissue. Two types of adipose tissue exist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Adipose tissue also serves as an important endocrine organ by producing hormones such as leptin, resistin and the cytokine TNFα. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.\

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