Pediatrics

Assessing body fat in children made simpler by new equation

Researchers at St George's have developed an accurate equation that will enable medical professionals to accurately predict body fat levels in children using only very simple measurements and other information.

Neuroscience

Sexual hormone oestradiol protects female brain in mid-life

Recent research suggests that increased visceral fat—that is body fat surrounding a number of important internal organs such as the liver, pancreas and intestines—carries the risk of cognitive impairment in later life. ...

Medical research

Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity?

Scientists from the University of Nottingham have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate 'brown fat', the body's own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.

Overweight & Obesity

Researchers conduct new diet study using MRI to map internal fat

A research team led by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Prof. Iris Shai has published a significant long-term study on the impact of Mediterranean and low-carb diets and exercise, measuring their impact with magnetic ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

How interval training affects 'belly fat' in obese 70-year-olds

By today's estimates, one-third of adults aged 65 or older are obese. This growing obesity trend, along with the decrease in our level of physical activity as we age, seriously raises our risk of diseases and death.

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Adipose tissue

In histology, adipose tissue or body fat or just fat is loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes. Adipose tissue is derived from lipoblasts. Its main role is to store energy in the form of fat, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Obesity or being overweight in humans and most animals does not depend on body weight but on the amount of body fat—specifically, adipose tissue. Two types of adipose tissue exist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Adipose tissue also serves as an important endocrine organ by producing hormones such as leptin, resistin and the cytokine TNFα. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.\

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