Oncology & Cancer

Excess body fat increases risk of digestive system cancers

Obesity increases the risk of developing cancers of the digestive system and it is the person's fat mass, rather than size, that is the main obesity-related risk factor for these cancer types, according to a new study published ...

Health

Sleep and fitness go hand-in-hand

The University of Saskatchewan's (USask) Dr. Heather Foulds (PhD) and her team of students have conducted a new study which confirms the connection between sleep and physical activity among middle-aged women.

Oncology & Cancer

Prostate cancer linked to obesity

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among Canadian men and the third leading cause of cancer death. Abdominal obesity appears to be associated with a greater risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. This ...

Overweight & Obesity

Semaglutide reduces excess body fat in people with obesity

In adults with obesity or overweight, weekly treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonist semaglutide leads to reduced excess body fat and increased lean body mass, according to an industry-sponsored ...

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Body weight

Although many people prefer the less-ambiguous term body mass, the term body weight is overwhelmingly used in daily English speech and in biological and medical science contexts to describe the mass of an organism's body. Body weight is measured in kilograms throughout the world, although in some countries people more often measure and describe body weight in pounds (e.g. United States and sometimes Canada) or stones and pounds (e.g. United Kingdom) and thus may not be well acquainted with measurement in kilograms. Most hospitals in the United States now use kilograms for calculations, but use kilograms and pounds together for other purposes. (1 kg is approximately 2.2 lb; 1 stone (14 lb) is approximately 6.4 kg.)

The term is usually encountered in connection with:

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