Pediatrics

Assessing body fat in children made simpler by new equation

Researchers at St George's have developed an accurate equation that will enable medical professionals to accurately predict body fat levels in children using only very simple measurements and other information.

Neuroscience

Biologist leads pioneering study on stress

A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could ...

Health

Do video games drive obesity?

A chubby teen lolling on the sofa for hours on end, the game controller in one hand, a bag of crisps at his side and a bottle of coke on the coffee table. This is the mental picture many people have of the typical gamer. ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

How interval training affects 'belly fat' in obese 70-year-olds

By today's estimates, one-third of adults aged 65 or older are obese. This growing obesity trend, along with the decrease in our level of physical activity as we age, seriously raises our risk of diseases and death.

Pediatrics

Stiffening arteries in teenagers with persistent obesity

Children and adolescents with long-term obesity have increased arterial stiffness by their late teens, a study of more than 3,000 children followed from age 9 to 17 shows. These results, in the researchers' view, call for ...

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Body weight

Although many people prefer the less-ambiguous term body mass, the term body weight is overwhelmingly used in daily English speech and in biological and medical science contexts to describe the mass of an organism's body. Body weight is measured in kilograms throughout the world, although in some countries people more often measure and describe body weight in pounds (e.g. United States and sometimes Canada) or stones and pounds (e.g. United Kingdom) and thus may not be well acquainted with measurement in kilograms. Most hospitals in the United States now use kilograms for calculations, but use kilograms and pounds together for other purposes. (1 kg is approximately 2.2 lb; 1 stone (14 lb) is approximately 6.4 kg.)

The term is usually encountered in connection with:

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