Neuroscience

Cancer-like metabolism makes brain grow

The size of the human brain increased profoundly during evolution. A certain gene that is only found in humans triggers brain stem cells to form a larger pool of stem cells. As a consequence, more neurons can arise, which ...

Medical research

Brain tumor research could help future precision medicine

New research on brain tumors could improve patient diagnosis and treatment options as part of a precision medicine approach. Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer deaths in children and adults under the age of 40, ...

Neuroscience

Radiation breaks connections in the brain

One of the potentially life-altering side effects that patients experience after cranial radiotherapy for brain cancer is cognitive impairment. Researchers now believe that they have pinpointed why this occurs and these findings ...

Oncology & Cancer

Ultrasound blasts potent glioblastoma drug into brain tumor

One of most potent drugs for treatment of glioblastoma, the most deadly type of brain tumor, can't be used in patients because of two problems. First, it can't reach its target because it's blocked by the blood-brain barrier, ...

Oncology & Cancer

New software tool uses AI to help doctors identify cancer cells

UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images—giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

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Brain tumor

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of cells within the brain or inside the skull, which can be cancerous or non-cancerous (benign).

It is defined as any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Primary (true) brain tumors are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

In the United States in the year 2005, it was estimated there were 43,800 new cases of brain tumors (Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Primary Brain Tumors in the United States, Statistical Report, 2005–2006), which accounted for 1.4 percent of all cancers, 2.4 percent of all cancer deaths, and 20–25 percent of pediatric cancers. Ultimately, it is estimated there are 13,000 deaths per year in the United States alone as a result of brain tumors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA