Oncology & Cancer

Dogs inhale immunotherapy to test lung cancer treatment

A protein that the body naturally produces could become an important new immunotherapy drug in the cache of cancer-fighting tools available to oncologists. UC Davis cancer researchers for both companion dogs and humans joined ...

Neuroscience

Study finds how the brain controls symptoms of sickness

When someone gets an infection, most people think it's the immune system kicking into gear when they feel some of the body's natural defenses like a fever, chills, or fatigue. What most people don't know is that it's actually ...

Neuroscience

Scientists build subcellular map of entire brain networks

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have developed an imaging technique to capture information about the structure and function of brain tissue at subcellular level—a few billionths of a meter, while also capturing ...

Oncology & Cancer

Precision oncology helps prostate cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Bern and University Hospital Bern have achieved a breakthrough in a particularly aggressive form of prostate cancer. In tissue samples from advanced brain metastases, they were able to establish ...

Oncology & Cancer

Nebraska-led project examines milk as possible cancer fighter

In health care, perhaps no word sends a more chilling message than "cancer." Brain tumors, for example, prove especially resistant to current treatments. Only 5% of patients with that condition survive more than three years ...

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Brain tumor

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of cells within the brain or inside the skull, which can be cancerous or non-cancerous (benign).

It is defined as any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Primary (true) brain tumors are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

In the United States in the year 2005, it was estimated there were 43,800 new cases of brain tumors (Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Primary Brain Tumors in the United States, Statistical Report, 2005–2006), which accounted for 1.4 percent of all cancers, 2.4 percent of all cancer deaths, and 20–25 percent of pediatric cancers. Ultimately, it is estimated there are 13,000 deaths per year in the United States alone as a result of brain tumors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA