Neuroscience

Phantom sensations: when the sense of touch deceives

Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations. A new study in the scientific journal Current Biology shows how healthy people can sometimes misattribute touch to the wrong side of their body, ...

Neuroscience

Rhythmic control of 'brain waves' can boost memory: study

Controlling the frequency of 'brain waves' could help to improve people's recall of memories and potentially provide a key to unlock conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, according to a new article.

Neuroscience

Brain stimulation enhances visual learning speed and efficiency

Practice results in better learning. Consider learning a musical instrument, for example: the more one practices, the better one will be able to learn to play. The same holds true for cognition and visual perception: with ...

Neuroscience

Researchers publish study on the flexibility of sensory perception

Hearing, sight, touch – our brain captures a wide range of distinct sensory stimuli and links them together. The brain has a kind of built-in filter function for this: sensory impressions are only integrated if it is necessary ...

Neuroscience

Gender impacts brain activity in alcoholics

Compared to alcoholic women, alcoholic men have more diminished brain activity in areas responsible for emotional processing (limbic regions including the amygdala and hippocampus), as well as memory and social processing ...

Neuroscience

For better deep neural network vision, just add feedback (loops)

Your ability to recognize objects is remarkable. If you see a cup under unusual lighting or from unexpected directions, there's a good chance that your brain will still compute that it is a cup. Such precise object recognition ...

page 1 from 23