Neuroscience

Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects

Imagine that you're late for work and desperately searching for your car keys. You've looked all over the house but cannot seem to find them anywhere. All of a sudden you realize your keys have been sitting right in front ...

Neuroscience

How we sleep today may forecast when Alzheimer's disease begins

What would you do if you knew how long you had until Alzheimer's disease set in? Don't despair. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests one defense against this virulent form of dementia—for which ...

Health

DIY device for monitoring sleep patterns

Audrey Duarte has spent most of her research career as a professor with the School of Psychology studying memory and aging. "It's really my bread and butter," Duarte says.

Health

Think pink: Getting a good night's sleep in difficult times

White noise is a popular solution for drowning out unwanted sounds, but there is actually an entire rainbow of sounds. New research from Penn State suggests that "pink noise" might enhance the quality of a person's sleep.

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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