Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New recommendations on mastitis spectrum diagnosis and treatment

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) has released new recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the mastitis spectrum. These recommendations are published in the journal Breastfeeding Medicine.

Health

Breastfeeding in rainy season 'wards off disease'

Breastfeeding infants continuously for six months during the rainy season, without including any other foods, may help prevent a disease linked to micronutrient deficiencies, a study suggests.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Examining the effects of breastfeeding on maternal mental health

A new systemic review of the literature examines the effects of breastfeeding on maternal mental health to inform breastfeeding recommendations. The results of this study are published in the Journal of Women's Health.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

New tool to calculate the value of breastfeeding

A simple new tool developed by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) will tally the volume and monetary value of breastmilk produced in Australia and around the globe.

Surgery

Experts sound alarm over baby tongue surgery

Lea had no problems breastfeeding her newborn son when she took him to see an osteopath in Paris, who nonetheless recommended surgery to cut a "too thick" strip of tissue under his tongue.

Autism spectrum disorders

New review finds autistic mothers face extra barriers to breastfeed

A new review by Swansea University, working with the University of Kent and non-profit organization, Autistic UK, has found that breastfeeding support from midwives and health visitors is often not well suited to meet the ...

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Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is the feeding of an infant or young child with breast milk directly from human breasts rather than from a baby bottle or other container. Babies have a sucking reflex that enables them to suck and swallow milk. Most mothers can breastfeed for six months or more, without the addition of infant formula or solid food.

Human breast milk is the most healthful form of milk for human babies. There are a few exceptions, such as when the mother is taking certain drugs or is infected with tuberculosis or HIV. Breastfeeding promotes health, helps to prevent disease and reduces health care and feeding costs. In both developing and developed countries, artificial feeding is associated with more deaths from diarrhea in infants. Experts agree that breastfeeding is beneficial, but may disagree about the length of breastfeeding that is most beneficial, and about the risks of using artificial formulas.

Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and then supplemented breastfeeding for up to one (AAP) or two years or more (WHO). Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life "provides continuing protection against diarrhea and respiratory tract infection" that are more common in babies fed formula. The WHO and AAP both stress the value of breastfeeding for mothers and children. While recognizing the superiority of breastfeeding, regulating authorities also work to minimize the risks of artificial feeding.

According to a WHO 2001 report, alternatives to breastfeeding include:

The acceptability of breastfeeding in public varies by culture and country. In Western culture, though most approve of breastfeeding, some mothers may be reluctant to do so out of fear of public opinion.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA