Diabetes

Breastfeeding and type 2 diabetes risk

Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, ...

Surgery

New guidelines say breastfeeding is safe after anaesthesia

New guidelines published by the Association of Anaesthetists in the journal Anaesthesia, to coincide with the start of World Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August) say that breastfeeding is safe after the mother has had anaesthesia, ...

Pediatrics

COVID-19 has prompted a return to breastfeeding

A Western Sydney University expert in infant feeding during emergencies has highlighted the impact of COVID-19 on new mums, who are placing increasing importance on breastfeeding during the pandemic.

Pediatrics

High marks in national breastfeeding care review

University of Virginia Medical Center and UVA Children's have earned excellent scores for their support of breastfeeding in a nationwide survey of hospitals conducted by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

WHO says COVID-positive mothers should breastfeed

New mothers infected with COVID-19 should generally continue breastfeeding and should not be separated from their babies, the World Health Organization said Friday, stressing that the benefits outweighed the risks.

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Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is the feeding of an infant or young child with breast milk directly from human breasts rather than from a baby bottle or other container. Babies have a sucking reflex that enables them to suck and swallow milk. Most mothers can breastfeed for six months or more, without the addition of infant formula or solid food.

Human breast milk is the most healthful form of milk for human babies. There are a few exceptions, such as when the mother is taking certain drugs or is infected with tuberculosis or HIV. Breastfeeding promotes health, helps to prevent disease and reduces health care and feeding costs. In both developing and developed countries, artificial feeding is associated with more deaths from diarrhea in infants. Experts agree that breastfeeding is beneficial, but may disagree about the length of breastfeeding that is most beneficial, and about the risks of using artificial formulas.

Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and then supplemented breastfeeding for up to one (AAP) or two years or more (WHO). Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life "provides continuing protection against diarrhea and respiratory tract infection" that are more common in babies fed formula. The WHO and AAP both stress the value of breastfeeding for mothers and children. While recognizing the superiority of breastfeeding, regulating authorities also work to minimize the risks of artificial feeding.

According to a WHO 2001 report, alternatives to breastfeeding include:

The acceptability of breastfeeding in public varies by culture and country. In Western culture, though most approve of breastfeeding, some mothers may be reluctant to do so out of fear of public opinion.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA