Medical research

Abnormal bone formation after trauma explained and reversed in mice

Hip replacements, severe burns, spinal cord injuries, blast injuries, traumatic brain injuries—these seemingly disparate traumas can each lead to a painful complication during the healing process called heterotopic ossification. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could your indigestion be GERD?

(HealthDay)—Heartburn. Millions of people suffer from it. But what exactly is it and, most important, could it actually be something serious?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Acid reflux affects nearly a third of US adults weekly

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive disorder that causes heartburn and other uncomfortable symptoms, may affect nearly a third of U.S. adults each week, and most of those who take certain popular medications ...

Health

Burn units need to cater to Indigenous kids

Aboriginal health workers in burn units, and greater cultural competence in clinicians and health services, are urgently needed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander burns patients who have the highest burn injury rates ...

Pediatrics

Hot drinks are the most common cause of burns to young children

New research has shown that hot drink scalds were the commonest cause of children under five presenting to emergency departments, and that only one in four children received adequate first aid before getting to hospital. ...

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Burn

A burn is a type of injury to flesh caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, light, radiation or friction. Most burns affect only the skin (epidermal tissue and dermis). Rarely, deeper tissues, such as muscle, bone, and blood vessels can also be injured. Burns may be treated with first aid, in an out-of-hospital setting, or may require more specialised treatment such as those available at specialised burn centers.

Managing burn injuries properly is important because they are common, painful and can result in disfiguring and disabling scarring, amputation of affected parts or death in severe cases. Complications such as shock, infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, electrolyte imbalance and respiratory distress may occur. The treatment of burns may include the removal of dead tissue (debridement), applying dressings to the wound, fluid resuscitation, administering antibiotics and skin grafting.

While large burns can be fatal, modern treatments developed in the last 60 years have significantly improved the prognosis of such burns, especially in children and young adults. In the United States, approximately 4 out of every 100 people with injuries from burns will succumb to their injuries. The majority of these fatalities occur either at the scene or enroute to hospital.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA