Medical research

The benefits of exercise in a pill? Science is closer to that goal

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine and collaborating institutions report today in the journal Nature that they have identified a molecule in the blood that is produced during exercise and ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Women burn fat even after menopause

The estrogen deficiency following menopause is thought to impair women's ability to use fat as an energy source. A study published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases and conducted at the Faculty of Sport ...

Medications

The unsuspected virtues of hot pepper

It adds punch, heat, personality. It injects flavor, color, aroma. It goes by many names—habanero, cayenne, jalapeño, poblano, bird's eye—but hot pepper by any name always gets a reaction.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could leg pain be due to varicose veins?

Patients experiencing an achy, heavy feeling or a burning sensation in their legs may be feeling the symptoms of varicose veins. These twisted, enlarged veins often develop as people age, but they also can begin when people ...

Medical research

How a burn could change your blood

UWA scientists have discovered a surprising and significant link between burn injuries and heart disease.

Medications

Autoimmune drug shows promise in treating severe burns

A severe burn injury is not static. Within 72 hours, partial thickness burns can progress, or convert, to full thickness burns, greatly increasing the risk of infection, incapacitating scarring, and even death.

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Burn

A burn is a type of injury to flesh caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, light, radiation or friction. Most burns affect only the skin (epidermal tissue and dermis). Rarely, deeper tissues, such as muscle, bone, and blood vessels can also be injured. Burns may be treated with first aid, in an out-of-hospital setting, or may require more specialised treatment such as those available at specialised burn centers.

Managing burn injuries properly is important because they are common, painful and can result in disfiguring and disabling scarring, amputation of affected parts or death in severe cases. Complications such as shock, infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, electrolyte imbalance and respiratory distress may occur. The treatment of burns may include the removal of dead tissue (debridement), applying dressings to the wound, fluid resuscitation, administering antibiotics and skin grafting.

While large burns can be fatal, modern treatments developed in the last 60 years have significantly improved the prognosis of such burns, especially in children and young adults. In the United States, approximately 4 out of every 100 people with injuries from burns will succumb to their injuries. The majority of these fatalities occur either at the scene or enroute to hospital.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA