Obstetrics & gynaecology

Emergency cesarean causes inflammatory response

Labor and natural childbirth cause stress on a mother's body but an emergency Cesarean is associated with even more inflammatory gene expression in the placenta, new South Australian research shows.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Women left in the dark when faced with a breech birth

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has revealed Western Australian women with a breech presenting baby may feel pressure to have a caesarean section, without being informed of all options available to them.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate

In a worldwide study of 2,100 pregnant women, those who contracted COVID-19 during pregnancy were 20 times more likely to die than those who did not contract the virus.

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Caesarean section

A Caesarean section (or Cesarean section in American English), also known as C-section or Caesar, is a surgical procedure in which incisions are made through a mother's abdomen (laparotomy) and uterus (hysterotomy) to deliver one or more babies. It is usually performed when a vaginal delivery would put the baby's or mother's life or health at risk, although in recent times it has been also performed upon request for childbirths that could otherwise have been natural. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the rate of Caesarean sections should not exceed 15% in any country. In 2006, the last year with available data, the rate of U.S. births by C-section was 31.1%, the highest it has ever been.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA