Medications

Number of poisoning-related deaths in New Zealand remain high

While there has been a decline in carbon monoxide deaths in New Zealand, the number of deaths relating to poisoning remain high with new research revealing a surprising number of deaths involving two prescription medicines, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Increased risk for oral cancer with exposure to high PM2.5

(HealthDay)—Taiwanese men exposed to high concentrations of fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) have an increased risk for oral cancer, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Investigative Medicine.

Health

Novel strategy to analyse biomarkers in exhaled breath

Breath gas analysis is a promising approach for non-invasive medical diagnostics and physiological monitoring, but further development is needed to increase clinical impact. Ramin Ghorbani presents a novel methodology for ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Nintedanib plus sildenafil no better than nintedanib in IPF

(HealthDay)—Nintedanib plus sildenafil does not provide benefit over nintedanib alone for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) of 35 percent or ...

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Carbon monoxide

Carbon monoxide, with the chemical formula CO, is a colorless, odorless and tasteless, yet highly toxic gas. Its molecules consist of one carbon atom and one oxygen atom, connected by a covalent double bond and a dative covalent bond. It is the simplest oxocarbon, and can be viewed as the anhydride of formic acid (CH2O2).

Carbon monoxide is produced from the partial oxidation of carbon-containing compounds; it forms in preference to the more usual carbon dioxide (CO2) when there is a reduced availability of oxygen, such as when operating a stove or an internal combustion engine in an enclosed space. Carbon monoxide has significant fuel value, burning in air with a characteristic blue flame, producing carbon dioxide. Despite its serious toxicity, it was once widely used (as the main component of coal gas) for domestic lighting, cooking and heating, and in the production of nickel. Carbon monoxide still plays a major role in modern technology, in industrial processes such as iron smelting and as a precursor to myriad products.

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