Cardiology

Bystander CPR less common in hispanic neighborhoods

(American Heart Association News)—Receiving CPR from a bystander can double the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest. But you're less likely to get this help—and less likely to survive—if your heart stops in a Hispanic ...

Cardiology

Bystanders can help more cardiac arrest victims survive

Only 8% of Americans survive cardiac arrest outside a hospital, but that percentage could increase significantly if bystanders recognize cardiac arrest and perform simple lifesaving tasks, a UVA Health physician says.

Cardiology

Risk for ischemic CV events lower with colchicine after MI

(HealthDay)—Patients with recent myocardial infarction have a lower risk for ischemic cardiovascular events with colchicine versus placebo, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine ...

Cardiology

Ischemia trial validates current practice standards

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography & Interventions (SCAI) congratulates the investigators of the ISCHEMIA trial on their very important late-breaking research presented today at the American Heart Association 2019 ...

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Cardiac arrest

A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole.

A cardiac arrest is different from (but may be caused by) a heart attack or myocardial infarction, where blood flow to the still-beating heart is interrupted (as in cardiogenic shock).

"Arrested" blood circulation prevents delivery of oxygen to all parts of the body. Cerebral hypoxia, or lack of oxygen supply to the brain, causes victims to lose consciousness and to stop normal breathing, although agonal breathing may still occur. Brain injury is likely if cardiac arrest is untreated for more than five minutes, although new treatments such as induced hypothermia have begun to extend this time. To improve survival and neurological recovery immediate response is paramount.

Cardiac arrest is a medical emergency that, in certain groups of patients, is potentially reversible if treated early enough (See "reversible causes" below). When unexpected cardiac arrest leads to death this is called sudden cardiac death (SCD). The primary first-aid treatment for cardiac arrest is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (commonly known as CPR) which provides circulatory support until availability of definitive medical treatment, which will vary dependent on the rhythm the heart is exhibiting, but often requires defibrillation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA