Pediatrics

Hey, new parents—go ahead and 'spoil' that baby!

When an infant cries, parents frequently wonder whether they should soothe the baby or let the baby calm itself down. If they respond to every sob, won't the baby cry more? Isn't that spoiling the baby?

Psychology & Psychiatry

The real cost to unpaid caregivers

Imagine two billion people working eight hours per day for no pay whatsoever. The fact is, you don't have to imagine it because this is the reality of the global informal unpaid caregiving load.

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Prevalence of arthritis higher among caregivers

The prevalence of arthritis is higher among caregivers than noncaregivers, and caregivers with arthritis are more likely to report disabilities, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Parent's mental health can affect kids' asthma care

When a parent is depressed, their child's asthma care may suffer. Now, research suggests that getting a child's asthma under control may include assessing a parents' mental health.

page 1 from 40

Caregiver

Carer (UK, NZ, Australian usage) and caregiver (US, Canadian usage) are words normally used to refer to unpaid relatives or friends of a disabled individual who help that individual with his or her activities of daily living.

The words may be prefixed with "family" "spousal", "child" to distinguish between different care situations, and also to distinguish them definitively from the paid version of a caregiver, a Personal Care Assistant or Personal Care Attendant (PCA). Around half of all carers are effectively excluded from other, paid employment through the heavy demands and responsibilities of caring for a vulnerable relative or friend. The term "carer" may also be used to refer to a paid, employed, contracted PCA.

The general term dependant care (i.e., care of a dependant) is also used for the provided help. Terms such as "voluntary caregiver" and "informal carer" are also used occasionally, but these terms have been criticized by carers as misnomers because they are perceived as belittling the huge impact that caring may have on an individual's life, the lack of realistic alternatives, and the degree of perceived duty of care felt by many relatives.

More recently, Carers UK has defined carers as people who "provide unpaid care by looking after an ill, frail or disabled family member, friend or partner". Adults who act as carers for both their children and their parents are frequently called the Sandwich generation.

A general definition of a carer/caregiver is someone who is responsible for the care of someone who is mentally ill, mentally handicapped, physically disabled or whose health is impaired by sickness or old age. To help caregivers understand the role they have taken on, "Next Step in Care" outlines the following:

You are a caregiver if you:

With an increasingly aging population in all developed societies, the role of carer has been increasingly recognized as an important one, both functionally and economically. Many organizations which provide support for persons with disabilities have developed various forms of support for carers as well.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA