Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Mayo Clinic minute: What is ulnar wrist pain?

If you have pain on the side of your wrist opposite your thumb, it's called ulnar wrist pain. There are many things that can cause it, and there are several ways to treat it.

Surgery

New strategies for engineering stable articular cartilage

A new study assesses the effect of the gremlin-1 (GREM1) protein on the in vitro and in vivo stability of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC)-derived cartilage engineered within scaffolds. The study design and results are reported ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Study shows how cartilage interacts with the joints in our bodies

Cartilage is a fascinating substance. It coats the ends of our bones, allowing them to glide by one another at joints like our elbows and our knees. The surface it creates is about five times more slippery than ice on ice.

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Cartilage

Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue existing within many joints. It is composed of specialized cells called chondrocytes that produce a large amount of extracellular matrix composed of collagen fibers, abundant ground substance rich in proteoglycan, and elastin fibers. Cartilage is classified in three types, elastic cartilage, hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage, which differ in the relative amounts of these three main components.

Cartilage is found in many areas in the body, including the articular surface of the bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs. Its mechanical properties are intermediate between bone and dense connective tissue like tendon.

Unlike other connective tissues, cartilage does not contain blood vessels. The chondrocytes are fed by diffusion, helped by the pumping action generated by compression of the articular cartilage or flexion of the elastic cartilage. Thus, compared to other connective tissues, cartilage grows and repairs more slowly.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA