Diabetes

CDC assesses burden of eye disorders in adults with diabetes

(HealthDay)—Eye disorders frequently affect adults aged 45 years and older with diagnosed diabetes, and disorders are more common for those with diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more, according to a July data brief published ...

Ophthalmology

Q&A: When can cataract surgery wait?

Dear Mayo Clinic: I was just diagnosed with a cataract, but it's not bothering me at all. Is it a good idea to have cataract surgery now, or can I wait? What is the recovery from this surgery like?

Ophthalmology

Patients satisfied with oral sedation for cataract surgery

(HealthDay)—Using oral sedation during cataract surgery does not negatively impact patient satisfaction compared with using an intravenous (IV) sedative, according to a study published online April 16 in Ophthalmology.

Health

Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light

A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study.

Surgery

Preoperative phone visits for cataract patients safe, efficient

(HealthDay)—Phone visits can safely substitute for a standard, in-person history and physical (H&P) in patients undergoing cataract surgery, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of General Internal ...

Ophthalmology

A human model to test implants for cataract surgery

Researchers at the University of East Anglia in collaboration with Hoya Surgical Optics have improved a laboratory model that simulates cataract surgery on human donor eyes.

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Cataract

A cataract is a clouding that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye or in its envelope, varying in degree from slight to complete opacity and obstructing the passage of light. Early in the development of age-related cataract, the power of the lens may be increased, causing near-sightedness (myopia), and the gradual yellowing and opacification of the lens may reduce the perception of blue colours. Cataracts typically progress slowly to cause vision loss, and are potentially blinding if untreated. The condition usually affects both eyes, but almost always one eye is affected earlier than the other.

A senile cataract, occurring in the elderly, is characterized by an initial opacity in the lens, subsequent swelling of the lens and final shrinkage with complete loss of transparency. Moreover, with time the cataract cortex liquefies to form a milky white fluid in a Morgagnian cataract, which can cause severe inflammation if the lens capsule ruptures and leaks. Untreated, the cataract can cause phacomorphic glaucoma. Very advanced cataracts with weak zonules are liable to dislocation anteriorly or posteriorly. Such spontaneous posterior dislocations (akin to the historical surgical procedure of couching) in ancient times were regarded as a blessing from the heavens, because some perception of light was restored in the cataractous patients.

Some children develop cataracts, called congenital cataracts, before or just after birth, but these are usually dealt with in a different way to cataracts in adults.

Cataract derives from the Latin cataracta meaning "waterfall" and that from the Greek καταράκτης (kataraktēs) or καταρράκτης (katarrhaktēs), "down-rushing", from καταράσσω (katarassō) meaning "to dash down" (from kata-, "down"; arassein, "to strike, dash"). As rapidly running water turns white, the term may later have been used metaphorically to describe the similar appearance of mature ocular opacities. In Latin, cataracta had the alternate meaning "portcullis" and it is possible that the name passed through French to form the English meaning "eye disease" (early 15c.), on the notion of "obstruction". Early Persian physicians called the term nazul-i-ah, or "descent of the water"—vulgarised into waterfall disease or cataract—believing such blindness to be caused by an outpouring of corrupt humour into the eye.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA