Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Catheter infections decline after preventive efforts

Patients with urinary catheters often get infections. But more comprehensive preventive efforts in health care cut the proportion affected in a group of frail elderly patients from 18 to 4 percent, a study led by University ...

Biomedical technology

Handheld surgical robot can help stem fatal blood loss

After a traumatic accident, there is a small window of time when medical professionals can apply lifesaving treatment to victims with severe internal bleeding. Delivering this type of care is complex, and key interventions ...

Cardiology

Remapping atrial fibrillation treatment

A new way of treating arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AF)—the most common heart arrhythmia diagnosis in clinical practice—has debuted at UC San Diego Health. vMap is a non-invasive, computational mapping system ...

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Catheter

In medicine a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct or vessel. Catheters thereby allow drainage, injection of fluids or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), although in some uses it is a larger, solid tube ("hard" catheter). A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.

The ancient Syrians created catheters from reeds. "Katheter" originally referred to an instrument that was inserted such as a plug. The word "katheter" in turn came from "kathiemai" meaning "to sound" with a probe. The ancient Greeks inserted a hollow metal tube through the urethra into the bladder to empty it and the tube came to be known as a "katheter".

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