Surgery

Urinary catheters not needed for joint replacement surgery

Patients undergoing joint replacement under epidural anesthesia have no increased risk for postoperative adverse genitourinary (GU) complications by skipping preoperative indwelling urinary catheters, according to a study ...

Cardiology

Guidelines on management of fast heartbeat published today

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on supraventricular tachycardia are published online today in European Heart Journal. The document highlights how catheter ablation is revolutionising care for this group ...

Oncology & Cancer

New score predicts risk for VTE in those with multiple myeloma

(HealthDay)—A new risk prediction score outperforms current guidelines for predicting venous thromboembolism (VTE) in multiple myeloma (MM), according to a study published online Aug. 4 in the American Journal of Hematology.

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Catheter

In medicine a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct or vessel. Catheters thereby allow drainage, injection of fluids or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), although in some uses it is a larger, solid tube ("hard" catheter). A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.

The ancient Syrians created catheters from reeds. "Katheter" originally referred to an instrument that was inserted such as a plug. The word "katheter" in turn came from "kathiemai" meaning "to sound" with a probe. The ancient Greeks inserted a hollow metal tube through the urethra into the bladder to empty it and the tube came to be known as a "katheter".

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