Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Central line-associated bloodstream infections increased in 2020

(HealthDay)—The national standardized infection ratio (SIR) for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) increased significantly in the second quarter (Q2) of 2020 compared with Q2 in 2019, with COVID-19 ...

Cardiology

Ablation beats drug therapy for women and men with A-fib

(HealthDay)—For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), those undergoing ablation have a significantly reduced risk for recurrent AF compared with those receiving drug therapy, regardless of sex, according to a study published ...

Health

Alcohol causes immediate effects linked to heart malady

A daily alcoholic drink for women or two for men might be good for heart health, compared to drinking more or not drinking at all. But while there is some evidence that drinking in moderation might prevent heart attacks, ...

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Catheter

In medicine a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct or vessel. Catheters thereby allow drainage, injection of fluids or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), although in some uses it is a larger, solid tube ("hard" catheter). A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.

The ancient Syrians created catheters from reeds. "Katheter" originally referred to an instrument that was inserted such as a plug. The word "katheter" in turn came from "kathiemai" meaning "to sound" with a probe. The ancient Greeks inserted a hollow metal tube through the urethra into the bladder to empty it and the tube came to be known as a "katheter".

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