Cardiology

Ablation beats drug therapy for women and men with A-fib

(HealthDay)—For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), those undergoing ablation have a significantly reduced risk for recurrent AF compared with those receiving drug therapy, regardless of sex, according to a study published ...

Health

Alcohol causes immediate effects linked to heart malady

A daily alcoholic drink for women or two for men might be good for heart health, compared to drinking more or not drinking at all. But while there is some evidence that drinking in moderation might prevent heart attacks, ...

Cardiology

Shot of alcohol can help an irregular heartbeat

Research out in this week's issue of JAMA confirms the success of a treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AFib) that combines the standard treatment, catheter ablation, with a separate infusion of ethanol, or alcohol, ...

Pediatrics

CLABSI rates have remained stable in neonatal, pediatric ICUs

(HealthDay)—Among critically ill neonates and children, the rates of central catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) remained stable from 2013 to 2018, while population-based catheter-associated urinary tract ...

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Catheter

In medicine, a catheter (pronounced /ˈkæθɪtər/) is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters thereby allow drainage, administration of fluids or gases, or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath (originally a trademark).

The ancient Syrians created catheters from reeds. "Katheter - καθετήρ" originally referred to an instrument that was inserted such as a plug. The word "katheter" in turn came from "kathiemai - καθίεμαι" meaning "to sit". The ancient Greeks inserted a hollow metal tube through the urethra into the bladder to empty it and the tube came to be known as a "katheter".

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