Oncology & Cancer

Many breast cancer patients can skip chemo, big study finds

Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to ...

Oncology & Cancer

Immune therapy scores big win against lung cancer in study

For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It's the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much ...

Neuroscience

Investigating how 'chemo brain' develops in cancer patients

During and after chemotherapy, many cancer patients describe feeling a mental fog, a condition that has been dubbed "chemo brain." Why this happens is unclear, but researchers have found a new clue to understanding this syndrome. ...

Oncology & Cancer

Gene test finds which breast cancer patients can skip chemo

Many women with early-stage breast cancer can skip chemotherapy without hurting their odds of beating the disease—good news from a major study that shows the value of a gene-activity test to gauge each patient's risk.

Oncology & Cancer

'Chemo brain' is real, say researchers

UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate. Dubbed 'chemo-brain,' the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but the UBC ...

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Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy (sometimes cancer chemotherapy) is the treatment of cancer with an antineoplastic drug or with a combination of such drugs into a standardized treatment regimen.

Most commonly, chemotherapy acts by killing cells that divide rapidly, one of the main properties of most cancer cells. This means that it also harms cells that divide rapidly under normal circumstances: cells in the bone marrow, digestive tract and hair follicles. This results in the most common side effects of chemotherapy: myelosuppression (decreased production of blood cells, hence also immunosuppression), mucositis (inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract), and alopecia (hair loss).

Newer anticancer drugs act directly against abnormal proteins in cancer cells; this is termed targeted therapy and is technically not chemotherapy.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA