Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Shot may protgect against shingles

Anyone who has had chickenpox or the chickenpox vaccine is at risk for the painful skin condition herpes zoster, more commonly known as shingles. Both diseases are caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which stays in the ...

Immunology

Chickenpox virus fatal in newly discovered immunodeficiency

A mutation in one of the sensors that the immune system uses to detect viruses can, in rare cases, turn infections with the chickenpox virus into a life-threatening matter. For two out of every 10,000 people, it can lead ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Chickenpox cases down 85 percent since two-dose vaccine started: CDC

(HealthDay)—Chickenpox—which is caused by the varicella-zoster virus—has continued declining in the United States since 2006, when doctors began routinely recommending a second dose of chickenpox (varicella) vaccine, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Google searches for 'chickenpox' reveal big impact of vaccinations

Countries that implement government-mandated vaccinations for chickenpox see a sharp drop in the number of Google searches for the common childhood disease afterward, demonstrating that immunization significantly reduces ...

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Chickenpox

Chickenpox or chicken pox is a highly contagious illness caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). It usually starts with vesicular skin rash mainly on the body and head rather than at the periphery and becomes itchy, raw pockmarks, which mostly heal without scarring. On examination, the observer typically finds lesions at various stages of healing.

Chickenpox is an airborne disease spread easily through coughing or sneezing of ill individuals or through direct contact with secretions from the rash. A person with chickenpox is infectious one to two days before the rash appears. The contagious period continues for 4 to 5 days after the appearance of the rash, or until all lesions have crusted over. Immunocompromised patients are probably contagious during the entire period new lesions keep appearing. Crusted lesions are not contagious.

It takes from 10 to 21 days after contact with an infected person for someone to develop chickenpox.

The onset of illness with chickenpox is often characterized by symptoms including myalgia, itching, nausea, fever, headache, sore throat, pain in both ears, complaints of pressure in head or swollen face, and malaise in adolescents and adults. In children, the first symptom is usually the development of a papular rash, followed by development of malaise, fever (a body temperature of 38 °C (100 °F), but may be as high as 42 °C (108 °F) in rare cases), sometimes severe back pains to the lower back, and anorexia (loss of appetite, not to be confused with anorexia nervosa). Typically, the disease is more severe in adults. Chickenpox is rarely fatal, although it is generally more severe in adult males than in adult females or children. Non-immune pregnant women and those with a suppressed immune system are at highest risk of serious complications. Chickenpox is believed to be the cause of one third of stroke cases in children. The most common late complication of chickenpox is shingles, caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus decades after the initial episode of chickenpox.

Chickenpox has been observed in other primates, including chimpanzees and gorillas.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA