Health

Study shows legal marijuana products too strong for pain relief

More than 90% of the legal marijuana products offered in medical dispensaries are much stronger than what clinical studies have shown that doctors recommend for chronic pain relief, according to a study published in the March ...

Neuroscience

Loss of 'Jedi' receptor alters neuron activity

The cell bodies of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to and transmit information about stimuli including touch, temperature and pain reside in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). DRG neuron hyperexcitability is correlated ...

Neuroscience

Pain researchers get a common language to describe pain

For the first time, an international collaboration of researchers have succeeded in creating a complete overview of all pain conditions in the face, mouth and jaw and classifying them in the same way.

Psychology & Psychiatry

What we see affects what we feel

Chronic back pain is reduced when people watch a real-time video of their back for a short time. Watching it also increases the effectiveness of therapies such as massage. This has been shown by studies conducted by the team ...

Medications

Opioids for chronic non-cancer pain doubled in quarter century

The number of people with chronic non-cancer pain prescribed an opioid medicine worldwide increased in the last two-and-a-half decades. But there was only a small number of studies reporting prescription data outside the ...

Medications

Managing pain in the age of opioids

The data supporting the use of opioids to treat chronic, non-cancer pain is quite weak, says Michael Ashburn, director of the Penn Pain Medicine Center at the Perelman School of Medicine. As few as one in five patients may ...

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Chronic pain

Chronic pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process.

The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage." Pain is subjective in nature and is defined by the person experiencing it, and the medical community's understanding of chronic pain now includes the impact that the mind has in processing and interpreting pain signals.

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