Psychology & Psychiatry

Experiencing physical pain can cause you to overspend

Suffering from pain causes consumers to spend more money than they otherwise would—perhaps 20% more—according to new research I conducted. This is based on the idea of what marketing scholars call the "pain of paying." ...

Health

Telemedicine saves chronic pain patients time and money

Patients who saw a pain medicine specialist via telemedicine saved time and money and were highly satisfied with their experience, even before the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study finds yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain

A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according ...

Health

Middle-aged Americans report more pain than the elderly

As people age, they tend to report more acute or chronic pain—a common sign of getting older. Yet, in the United States, middle-aged adults are now reporting more pain than the elderly, according to a paper published in ...

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Chronic pain

Chronic pain is defined as pain that persists longer than the temporal course of natural healing, associated with a particular type of injury or disease process.

The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage." Pain is subjective in nature and is defined by the person experiencing it, and the medical community's understanding of chronic pain now includes the impact that the mind has in processing and interpreting pain signals.

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