Genetics

Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks

A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The ribosomal clock ...

Neuroscience

Women's brains appear three years younger than men's

Time wears differently on women's and men's brains. While the brain tends to shrink with age, men's diminish faster than women's. The brain's metabolism slows as people grow older, and this, too, may differ between men and ...

Medical research

Scientists search for the clocks behind aging brain disorders

To understand the link between aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, scientists from the National Institutes of Health compared the genetic clocks that tick during the lives of normal and mutant ...

Medical research

Simple urine test could measure how much our body has aged

Researchers find that a substance indicating oxidative damage increases in urine as people get older. The study, published today in open-access journal in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, also describes a way to easily measure ...

Medical research

Aging tests yield varying results

Whether it's an on-line quiz, a $300 chromosome test or an $800 blood panel, a lot of people seem to be interested in whether they're aging faster or slower than their chronological age would suggest.

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