Neuroscience

Brain or muscles: Which do we lose first?

Someone dies as a result of physical inactivity somewhere in the world every 10 seconds—3.2 million people a year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). From the age of 50, there is a gradual decline not just ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

When should you worry about your memory?

Have you ever been ready to head out the door but can't seem to remember where you put your keys? Or have you been standing in the grocery store trying to remember what else you need?

Neuroscience

The brain may need iron for healthy cognitive development

Iron levels in brain tissue rise during development and are correlated with cognitive abilities, according to research in children and young adults recently published in JNeurosci. Future work could lead to iron supplementation ...

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Cognition

Cognition is the scientific term for "the process of thought". Its usage varies in different ways in accord with different disciplines: For example, in psychology and cognitive science it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions. Other interpretations of the meaning of cognition link it to the development of concepts; individual minds, groups, organizations, and even larger coalitions of entities, can be modelled as "societies" (Society of Mind), which cooperate to form concepts.

The autonomous elements of each 'society' would have the opportunity to demonstrate emergent behavior in the face of some crisis or opportunity. Cognition can also be interpreted as "understanding and trying to make sense of the world".

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