Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain regions with impaired blood flow have higher tau levels

In Alzheimer's disease, impaired blood flow to brain regions coincides with tau protein buildup. This relationship strengthens as cognition declines, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Is sitting always bad for older adults? A new study says maybe not

It's generally accepted health advice that adults of all ages should sit less, move more, and engage in regular exercise to feel better and reduce the risk of chronic diseases. However, when it comes to the brain and cognition, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Awareness of COVID-19 in severe dementia patients

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially affected patients with dementia and their caregivers. Owing to the restrictive measures taken worldwide to block the spread of COVID-19 outbreaks ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive impairment

Languages are used to convey thoughts, identity, knowledge, and the way people see and understand the world. Mastering more than one language provides a gateway to other cultures, and according to a team of researchers led ...

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Cognitive dysfunction

Cognitive dysfunction (or brain fog) is defined as unusually poor mental function, associated with confusion, forgetfulness and difficulty concentrating. A number of medical or psychiatric conditions and treatments can cause such symptoms, including Heavy metal poisoning (in particular mercury poisoning), menopause and sleep disorders (including disrupted sleep). The term brain fog is not commonly used to describe people with dementia or other conditions that are known to cause confusion and memory problems,[citation needed] but it can be used as a synonym for sleep inertia or grogginess upon being awakened from deep sleep.

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