Gerontology & Geriatrics

With age comes hearing loss and a greater risk of cognitive decline

Hearing impairment is a common consequence of advancing age. Almost three-quarters of U.S. adults age 70 and older suffer from some degree of hearing loss. One unanswered question has been to what degree hearing impairment ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Does intensive blood pressure control reduce dementia?

Intensive lowering of blood pressure did not significantly reduce dementia risk but did have a measurable impact on mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to the final, peer-reviewed results from the Systolic Blood Pressure ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How psychological science is benefiting the world

Technological advances have allowed psychological scientists to measure everything from cognitive impairments to everyday decision-making. Now, the scientists are using their research to inform tools, programs, and interventions ...

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Cognitive dysfunction

Cognitive dysfunction (or brain fog) is defined as unusually poor mental function, associated with confusion, forgetfulness and difficulty concentrating. A number of medical or psychiatric conditions and treatments can cause such symptoms, including Heavy metal poisoning (in particular mercury poisoning), menopause and sleep disorders (including disrupted sleep). The term brain fog is not commonly used to describe people with dementia or other conditions that are known to cause confusion and memory problems,[citation needed] but it can be used as a synonym for sleep inertia or grogginess upon being awakened from deep sleep.

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