Psychology & Psychiatry

'Philosophy lab test' finds objective vision impossible

Johns Hopkins University researchers who study the mind and brain used methods from cognitive science to test a long-standing philosophical question: Can people see the world objectively?

Neuroscience

Like a treasure map, brain region emphasizes reward location

We are free to wander but usually when we go somewhere it's for a reason. In a new study, researchers at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory show that as we pursue life's prizes a region of the brain tracks our ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How the heart affects our perception

The heart and brain communicate constantly. For example, when encountering a dangerous situation, signals from the brain ensure that the heart beats faster. When relaxing, the heart slows down. Interestingly, the heartbeat ...

Neuroscience

State of mind: The end of personality as we know it

We all have our varying mental emphases, inclinations, and biases. These individual dispositions are dynamic in that they can change over time and context. In a study published today in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, ...

Neuroscience

Microscopic eye movements vital for 20/20 vision

Visual acuity—the ability to discern letters, numbers, and objects from a distance—is essential for many tasks, from recognizing a friend across a room to driving a car.

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Cognitive science

Cognitive science may be concisely defined as the study of the nature of intelligence. It draws on multiple empirical disciplines, including psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, linguistics, anthropology, computer science, sociology and biology. The term cognitive science was coined by Christopher Longuet-Higgins in his 1973 commentary on the Lighthill report, which concerned the then-current state of Artificial Intelligence research. In the same decade, the journal Cognitive Science and the Cognitive Science Society were founded. Cognitive science differs from cognitive psychology in that algorithms that are intended to simulate human behavior are implemented or implementable on a computer.

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