Neuroscience

Time span of football play not linked to concussion recovery

(HealthDay)—Longer exposure to playing football during childhood and adolescence appears to be unrelated to clinical recovery following college football concussion, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Neurology.

Neuroscience

Using infrared eye tracking to study infant behavior

A new study from the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology describes how existing infrared technology can be adapted to measure recognition memory and other cognitive outcomes in infants.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Cycling among top causes of concussion

This is a big summer for people to take their holiday in Norway. There are peaks to be climbed, rivers to be paddled and dreams to be fulfilled. For some vacationers, holidays might also include bone fractures, falls and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study: Bilingualism does not make you 'smarter'

Despite numerous social, employment, and lifestyle benefits, speaking more than one language does not improve your general mental ability, according to a new study by Western's Brain and Mind Institute.

Neuroscience

Study links concussions to loss of inhibition

Consistent signs of compromised inhibition found in a study of concussion sufferers were mirrored in separate tests on Canadian university football players. These findings open new doors to predicting the impact of the often ...

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Cognitive test

Cognitive tests are assessments of the cognitive capabilities of humans and animals. Tests administered to humans include various forms of IQ tests; those administered to animals include the mirror test (a test of visual self-awareness) and the T maze test (which tests learning ability). Such study is important to research concerning the philosophy of mind and psychology, as well as determination of human and animal intelligence.

Modern cognitive tests originated through the work of Sir Francis Galton who coined the term "mental tests". Consistent with views of the late nineteenth century, most of his measurements were physical and physiological, rather than "mental". For instance he measured strength of grip and height and weight. He established an "Anthropometric Laboratory" in the 1880's where patrons paid to have physical and physiological attributes measured to estimate their intelligence. So, his measures of mental or cognitive components were not successful in modern terms, although his indirect effects were arguably enormous. His work influenced later researchers who developed better measures of intelligence using cognitive tests (see Alfred Binet , Raymond Cattell and Lewis Terman).

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