Oncology & Cancer

Creating a roadmap to reducing colorectal cancer deaths

Fewer people would die of colorectal cancer if health care providers adopted a new model of screening that combines better risk assessment, more options for noninvasive testing and more targeted referrals for colonoscopy.

Oncology & Cancer

Complications after colonoscopy up for those aged ≥ 75

(HealthDay)—For individuals undergoing outpatient colonoscopy, the risk of 30-day postcolonoscopy complications is increased for those aged ≥75 years, according to a study published online June 25 in JAMA Network Open.

Oncology & Cancer

When to get your next colonoscopy

The colorectal cancer mortality rate in the United States is down more than 50% from what it was two decades ago, when doctors started using the colonoscopy more as a screening tool than a diagnostic tool.

Oncology & Cancer

How colonoscopies save lives

Men are slightly more likely than women to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and African-Americans have a higher risk than people of other races. However, everyone is at risk for developing the disease, especially after ...

Oncology & Cancer

Prompt colonoscopy should follow up positive bowel cancer tests

A prompt colonoscopy should be provided to all patients with positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) results, regardless of whether the test was offered through the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program, or via a community-based ...

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Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy is the endoscopic examination of the large colon and the distal part of the small bowel with a CCD camera or a fiber optic camera on a flexible tube passed through the anus. It may provide a visual diagnosis (e.g. ulceration, polyps) and grants the opportunity for biopsy or removal of suspected lesions.

Virtual colonoscopy, which uses 2D and 3D imagery reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) scans or from nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) scans, is also possible, as a totally non-invasive medical test, although it is not standard and still under investigation regarding its diagnostic abilities. Furthermore, virtual colonoscopy does not allow for therapeutic maneuvers such as polyp/tumor removal or biopsy nor visualization of lesions smaller than 5 millimeters. If a growth or polyp is detected using CT colonography, a standard colonoscopy would still need to be performed.

Colonoscopy can remove polyps as small as one millimeter or less. Once polyps are removed, they can be studied with the aid of a microscope to determine if they are precancerous or not.

Colonoscopy is similar to but not the same as sigmoidoscopy, the difference being related to which parts of the colon each can examine. While colonoscopy allows an examination of the entire colon (measuring four to five feet in length), sigmoidoscopy allows doctors to view only the final two feet of the colon. A sigmoidoscopy is often used as a screening procedure for a full colonoscopy, in many instances in conjunction with a fecal occult blood test (FOBT), which can detect the formation of cancerous cells throughout the colon. Other times, a sigmoidoscopy is preferred to a full colonoscopy in patients having an active flare of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease to avoid perforation of the colon. Additionally, surgeons have lately been using the term pouchoscopy to refer to a colonoscopy of the ileo-anal pouch.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA