Ophthalmology

New approach to slowing nearsightedness in children shows promise

Combining two different treatment methods to slow the progression of myopia may deliver better results than either can achieve on their own. A new, two-year study shows that treating children with eye drops and contact lenses ...

Health

10 quick tips for a healthier, safer life

Some things that you can do to protect your health take just minutes, so no more excuses! Here are 10 suggestions from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ophthalmology

How to relieve dry, irritated eyes

(HealthDay)—Do all the ads for dry eye relief have you thinking you could have this condition? If you've ever felt like you had a grain of sand in your eye when nowhere close to the beach, you could be experiencing dry ...

Health

4 personal items you probably should replace today

Is your toothbrush more than four months old? And how about your contact lens case? These and other everyday essentials need regular replacing, no matter how comfortable you are with them.

Health

How to head off a pain in the neck

(HealthDay)—Neck pain can sneak up on you over time. While it can be caused by an accident or injury, your everyday posture and body mechanics can also be to blame, from the way you carry a shoulder bag, cradle your phone ...

Ophthalmology

Contact lens-based antihistamine delivery effective

(HealthDay)—A contact lens (CL)-based drug delivery system is effective for therapeutic delivery of the antihistamine ketotifen, according to a study published online March 19 in Cornea.

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Contact lens

A contact lens (also known simply as a contact) is a corrective, cosmetic, or therapeutic lens usually placed on the cornea of the eye. Modern soft contact lenses were invented by the Czech chemist Otto Wichterle and his assistant Drahoslav Lím, who also invented the first gel used for their production.

Contact lens usually serve the same corrective purpose as glasses, but are lightweight and virtually invisible—many commercial lenses are tinted a faint blue to make them more visible when immersed in cleaning and storage solutions. Some cosmetic lenses are deliberately colored to alter the appearance of the eye.

It has been estimated that 125 million people use contact lenses worldwide (2%), including 28 to 38 million in the United States and 13 million in Japan. The types of lenses used and prescribed vary markedly between countries, with rigid lenses accounting for over 20% of currently-prescribed lenses in Japan, Netherlands and Germany but less than 5% in Scandinavia.

People choose to wear contact lenses for many reasons, often due to their appearance and practicality. When compared to spectacles, contact lenses are less affected by wet weather, do not steam up, and provide a wider field of vision. They are more suitable for a number of sporting activities. Additionally, ophthalmological conditions such as keratoconus and aniseikonia may not be accurately corrected with glasses.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA