Ophthalmology

Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children

Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings support ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Your eyewear and COVID-19 safety

(HealthDay)—Coronavirus-related safety is crucial if you wear contact lenses, eyeglasses or safety glasses/goggles, experts say.

Diabetes

Smart contact lenses that diagnose and treat diabetes

Diabetes is called an incurable disease because once it develops, it does not disappear regardless of treatment. Having diabetes means a life-long obligation of insulin shots and monitoring of blood glucose levels. But what ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could your contact lenses track, treat your diabetes?

Contact lenses may someday do more than correct poor vision, with new, preliminary research in animals suggesting they could also monitor your diabetes and deliver medications.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

With coronavirus a threat, stop wearing contact lenses

(HealthDay)—Even if you're already wearing a face mask to cover your mouth and nose, taking steps to protect your eyes might also help guard against coronavirus infection, eye health experts say.

Health

Medication errors prevented with optimized lighting

Western societies currently face the challenge of maintaining the high standard of health care (both affordable and available), with a growing shortage of care professionals. A well-designed hospital environment can positively ...

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Contact lens

A contact lens (also known simply as a contact) is a corrective, cosmetic, or therapeutic lens usually placed on the cornea of the eye. Modern soft contact lenses were invented by the Czech chemist Otto Wichterle and his assistant Drahoslav Lím, who also invented the first gel used for their production.

Contact lens usually serve the same corrective purpose as glasses, but are lightweight and virtually invisible—many commercial lenses are tinted a faint blue to make them more visible when immersed in cleaning and storage solutions. Some cosmetic lenses are deliberately colored to alter the appearance of the eye.

It has been estimated that 125 million people use contact lenses worldwide (2%), including 28 to 38 million in the United States and 13 million in Japan. The types of lenses used and prescribed vary markedly between countries, with rigid lenses accounting for over 20% of currently-prescribed lenses in Japan, Netherlands and Germany but less than 5% in Scandinavia.

People choose to wear contact lenses for many reasons, often due to their appearance and practicality. When compared to spectacles, contact lenses are less affected by wet weather, do not steam up, and provide a wider field of vision. They are more suitable for a number of sporting activities. Additionally, ophthalmological conditions such as keratoconus and aniseikonia may not be accurately corrected with glasses.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA