Health

Is your body clock off-schedule? Prebiotics may help

Whether it's from jetting across time zones, pulling all-nighters at school or working the overnight shift, chronically disrupting our circadian rhythm—or internal biological clocks—can take a measurable toll on everything ...

Medical research

Hypothermia may go unnoticed when exercising in the cold

In a study published this month in Physiology & Behavior, research teams at the University of Tsukuba, led by Takeshi Nishiyasu, and at Niigata University of Health and Welfare, led by Tomomi Fujimoto, have found that, when ...

Health

Researcher examines extreme heat, multiple sclerosis link

Public health scientist Naresh Kumar found that clinical visits by multiple sclerosis patients to Veterans Affairs medical centers increased during months associated with warmer weather and high humidity. With sweltering ...

Medical research

Making innovations in surgery safer

A study to help surgical innovations be developed more safely and efficiently has published a 'core outcome set' for new surgical techniques and devices in the Annals of Surgery. The COHESIVE study, led by National Institute ...

Health

Blue light creates negative physiological changes during sleep

Extended exposure to light during nighttime can have negative consequences for human health. But now, researchers from Japan have identified a new type of light with reduced consequences for physiological changes during sleep.

Pediatrics

New innovation successfully treats neonatal hypothermia

Neonatal hypothermia—which occurs when an infant's core body temperature falls below the normal range needed to maintain health—contributes to approximately one million deaths each year, and countless cases of stunted ...

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Eudicots

Eudicots and Eudicotyledons are botanical terms introduced by Doyle & Hotton (1991) to refer to a monophyletic group of flowering plants that had been called tricolpates or non-Magnoliid dicots by previous authors. The term means, literally, "true dicotyledons" as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicotyledons and have typical dicotyledonous characters. The term "eudicots" has been widely adopted to refer to one of the two largest clades of angiosperms (constituting over 70% of angiosperm species), monocots being the other. The remaining dicots are sometimes referred to as paleodicots but this term has not been widely adopted as it does not refer to a monophyletic group.

A large number of familiar plants are eudicots. A few are forget-me-not, cabbage, apple, dandelion, buttercup, maple and macadamia.

Another name for the eudicots is tricolpates, a name which refers to the structure of the pollen. The group has tricolpate pollen, or forms derived from it. These pollen have three or more pores set in furrows called colpi. In contrast, most of the other seed plants (that is the gymnosperms, the monocots and the paleodicots) produce monosulcate pollen, with a single pore set in a differently oriented groove called the sulcus. The name "tricolpates" is preferred by some botanists in order to avoid confusion with the dicots, a non-monophyletic group (Judd & Olmstead 2004).

The name eudicots (plural) is used in the APG system, of 1998, and APG II system, of 2003, for classification of angiosperms. It is applied to a clade, a monophyletic group, which includes most of the (former) dicotyledons.

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