Health

Raw milk may do more harm than good

Raw or unpasteurized cows' milk from U.S. retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. ...

Health

Milk production declines due to heat stress in Northern China

Northern China is a major dairy-producing region. However, milk production is expected to decline drastically by 2050, with losses potentially up to 50% by 2070, because of heat stress in July, according to a new study.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hindu group touts cow urine elixir for coronavirus

Dozens of Hindu activists held a cow urine party in the Indian capital Saturday to protect themselves from the new coronavirus, as countries around the world struggle to control the deadly pandemic.

Medical research

In science, it's better to be curious than correct

I'm a geneticist. I study the connection between information and biology—essentially what makes a fly a fly and a human a human. Interestingly, we're not that different. I've been a professional geneticist since the early ...

Neuroscience

Fertility and prion disease

A high degree of uncertainty surrounds the issue of the prion disease risk associated with fertility drugs derived from urine, gonadotropins. Writing in the International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management, a team ...

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Cattle

Bos taurus, Bos indicus

Cattle (colloquially cows) are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos primigenius. Cattle are raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (oxen / bullocks) (pulling carts, plows and the like). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel. In some countries, such as India, cattle are sacred. It is estimated that there are 1.3 billion cattle in the world today. In 2009, cattle became the first livestock animal to have its genome mapped.

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