Health

Care home dehydration tests don't work

Standard tests used to identify dehydration are not working for older people living in care homes—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Health

Study finds a lack of adequate hydration among the elderly

Drinking enough water is a concern for everyone, but the elderly are particularly prone to underhydration and dehydration. A new UCLA School of Nursing study shows that these conditions are likely to be under-recognized, ...

Health

Shorter sleep can lead to dehydration

Adults who sleep just six hours per night—as opposed to eight—may have a higher chance of being dehydrated, according to a study by Penn State.

Health

European workers fail to hydrate properly

A newly published scientific paper indicates that occupational safety and daily day performance in seven out of 10 workers from several European industries are negatively affected by a combination of heat stress and failure ...

Health

Drinking water may help exercising seniors stay mentally sharp

Older people should drink more water to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, new research suggests. The study, to be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Genetic mechanism prevents kidney injury after severe dehydration

Millions of people die every year from dehydration as a result of exposure and illness. In humans, even the most minor dehydration can compromise the kidneys causing lifelong, irreparable issues or even death. However, some ...

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Dehydration

In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid. It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. Dehydration of skin and mucous membranes can be called medical dryness.

There are three types of dehydration: hypotonic or hyponatremic (primarily a loss of electrolytes, sodium in particular), hypertonic or hypernatremic (primarily a loss of water), and isotonic or isonatremic (equal loss of water and electrolytes). In humans, the most commonly seen type of dehydration by far is isotonic (isonatraemic) dehydration which effectively equates with hypovolemia, but the distinction of isotonic from hypotonic or hypertonic dehydration may be important when treating people who become dehydrated. Physiologically, dehydration, despite the name, does not simply mean loss of water, as water and solutes (mainly sodium) are usually lost in roughly equal quantities to how they exist in blood plasma. In hypotonic dehydration, intravascular water shifts to the extravascular space, exaggerating intravascular volume depletion for a given amount of total body water loss. Neurological complications can occur in hypotonic and hypertonic states. The former can lead to seizures, while the latter can lead to osmotic cerebral edema upon rapid rehydration.

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