Cardiology

Specific NSAIDs increase nonfatal ischemic stroke risk

(HealthDay)—Use of specific nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac and aceclofenac, is associated with increased risk of nonfatal ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the ...

Ophthalmology

Topical diclofenac unnecessary post-photorefractive keratectomy

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy surgery, the administration of postoperative topical diclofenac does not alleviate pain, but is effective for local signs such as eyelid edema, according to ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

NSAIDs do not increase risk of miscarriages, study reports

Women who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during pregnancy are not at increased risk of miscarriages, confirms a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Oncology & Cancer

Added benefit of ingenol mebutate is not proven

The drug ingenol mebutate (trade name: Picato) has been approved in Germany since November 2012 as a gel for the treatment of certain forms of actinic keratosis in adults. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the Act ...

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Diclofenac

Diclofenac (marketed under many brand names, see below: Trade names) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) taken to reduce inflammation and as an analgesic reducing pain in certain conditions.

The name is derived from its chemical name: 2-(2,6-dichloranilino) phenylacetic acid.

In the United Kingdom, India, Brazil and the United States, it may be supplied as either the sodium or potassium salt, in China most often as the sodium salt, while in some other countries only as the potassium salt. Diclofenac is available as a generic drug in a number of formulations. Over-the-counter (OTC) use is approved in some countries for minor aches and pains and fever associated with common infections.

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