Inflammatory disorders

Rethinking an inflammatory receptor's obesity connection

Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a protein that plays a vital role in the body's immune response by sensing the presence of infection. It has long been thought to also sense particular types of fats, which suggested a mechanism ...

Cardiology

AMA offering new nutrition science course for physicians

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) is offering a three-hour online nutrition course for physicians to help patients make the nutritional changes they need to prevent and help treat heart disease, diabetes, ...

Medical research

Researchers report findings on the effects of fat on stem cells

You really are what you eat—especially when it comes to fats, according to a study this week in the journal Science Advances that was co-authored by Rice University undergraduate Allison Skinkle and colleagues at the Laboratory ...

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Unsaturated fat

An unsaturated fat is a fat or fatty acid in which there are one or more double bonds in the fatty acid chain. A fat molecule is monounsaturated if it contains one double bond, and polyunsaturated if it contains more than one double bond. Where double bonds are formed, hydrogen atoms are eliminated. Thus, a saturated fat is "saturated" with hydrogen atoms. In cellular metabolism hydrogen-carbon bonds are broken down – or oxidized – to produce energy, thus an unsaturated fat molecule contains somewhat less energy (i.e fewer calories) than a comparable sized saturated fat. The greater the degree of unsaturation in a fatty acid (ie, the more double bonds in the fatty acid), the more vulnerable it is to lipid peroxidation (rancidity). Antioxidants can protect unsaturated fat from lipid peroxidation. Unsaturated fats also have a more enlarged shape than saturated fats.[citation needed]

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