Health

Pregnancy is no picnic when it comes to listeria

Food safety is important for everybody, but it is especially important if you're expecting. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can change a pregnant person's immune system, making her more susceptible to contracting foodborne ...

Neuroscience

Brain imaging device based on quantum optical sensors

For years, Professor Lauri Parkkonen's team at Aalto University has been developing quantum optical sensors for measuring the brain's magnetic fields using a technique known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). In traditional ...

HIV & AIDS

Pets help AIDS survivors through two pandemics

During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people turned to their pets to help them feel less lonely and isolated. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, wanted to learn what role pets played in helping ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

What do I need to know about monkeypox?

The current outbreak of monkeypox in several countries across the globe continues to grow, and while experts agree that overall risk to the general population remains low and the outbreak is containable, the surge has raised ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Dog-mediated rabies remains persistently endemic in Africa

Dog-mediated rabies, a fatal disease that kills tens of thousands of people in Africa every year, remains persistently endemic in affected regions. That is, despite an overall low virus prevalence, and attempts to combat ...

page 1 from 40

Dog

The dog (Canis lupus familiaris, pronounced /ˈkeɪ.nis ˈluːpəs fʌˈmɪliɛəris/) is a domesticated subspecies of the Gray Wolf, a member of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. The term is used for both feral and pet varieties. The domestic dog has been one of the most widely kept working and companion animals in human history. Amongst canine enthusiasts, the word "dog" may also mean the male of a canine species, as opposed to the word "bitch."

The dog quickly became ubiquitous across culture in all parts of the world, and was extremely valuable to early human settlements. For instance, it is believed that the successful emigration across the Bering Strait might not have been possible without sled dogs. Dogs perform many roles for people, such as hunting, herding, protection, and, more recently, assisting handicapped individuals. Currently, there are estimated to be 400 million dogs in the world.

Over the 15,000 year span that the dog had been domesticated, it diverged into only a handful of landraces, groups of similar animals whose morphology and behavior have been shaped by environmental factors and functional roles. As the modern understanding of genetics developed, humans began to intentionally breed dogs for a wide range of specific traits. Through this process, the dog has developed into hundreds of varied breeds, and shows more behavioral and morphological variation than any other land mammal. For example, height measured to the withers ranges from a few inches in the Chihuahua to a few feet in the Irish Wolfhound; color varies from white through grays (usually called "blue'") to black, and browns from light (tan) to dark ("red" or "chocolate") in a wide variation of patterns; coats can be short or long, coarse-haired to wool-like, straight, curly, or smooth. It is common for most breeds to shed this coat, but non-shedding breeds are also popular.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA