Neuroscience

Want to fire up the dance floor? Play low-frequency bass

To find out how different aspects of music influence the body, researchers turned a live electronic music concert into a lab study. By introducing levels of bass over speakers that were too low to hear and monitoring the ...

Health

Quit removing wax from your ears

It can be a common habit—after a shower or getting out of the pool, grabbing a cotton-tipped swab to clean out one's ears to help get rid of excess water, or to remove what one thinks is earwax build-up.

Medical research

Scientists discover mechanism of hearing

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University have revealed, for the first time and in near-atomic detail, the structure of the key part of the inner ear responsible for hearing.

Neuroscience

New research throws doubt on old ideas of how hearing works

The way in which we experience music and speech differs from what has until now been believed. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, and the Oregon Health and Science University, ...

Biomedical technology

Q&A: What is the benefit of cochlear implants over hearing aids?

I'm 70 years old and have worn hearing aids for about a decade. Over the past several years, my hearing seems to be getting worse. Although I have tried several different kinds of hearing aids, I feel as if they are not effective ...

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Ear

The ear is the organ that detects sound. It not only receives sound, but also aids in balance and body position. The ear is part of the auditory system.

The word "ear" may be used correctly to describe the entire organ or just the visible portion. In most mammals, the visible ear is a flap of tissue that is also called the pinna and is the first of many steps in hearing. In people, the pinna is often called the auricle. Vertebrates have a pair of ears, placed somewhat symmetrically on opposite sides of the head. This arrangement aids in the ability to localize sound sources.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA