Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola still an 'urgent' global health emergency: WHO

The deadly Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) remains an "urgent" global health emergency, The World Health Organization (WHO) said Friday at its Emergency Committee meeting.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola virus now squeezed into 'corner' of DR Congo: WHO

Efforts to halt an Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo have made "significant progress", with the virus now contained to a far smaller and mainly rural area, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Thursday.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

DRC approves use of second experimental Ebola vaccine

The Democratic Republic of Congo will introduce a second Ebola vaccine next month, the World Health Organization said Monday, as a top medical charity accused the UN agency of rationing doses of the main drug to protect against ...

Medical research

Mutant live attenuated Ebola virus immunizes non-human primates

Inoculation with an Ebola virus that has mutations in a protein called VP35 does not cause disease and elicits protection in monkeys, researchers show September 17 in the journal Cell Reports. The findings suggest that the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola's economic effects

While the world's media may well have moved on to new stories, the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which was one of the most devastating in history, continues to have a significant impact on the lives of those affected ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Children on front line of fight to stop spread of Ebola

Before dawn, Congolese teenager Doneka Kabowo sets off for school in Uganda, negotiating miles of jungle, the threat of armed militias and an international border to reach her classroom.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola expert weighs in on news of a potential cure

Scientists recently reported that two treatments saved the lives of people infected with the Ebola virus—with the New York Times reporting that roughly 90% of newly infected patients were saved—suggesting we are ever ...

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Ebola

Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus

Ebola is the common term for a group of viruses belonging to genus Ebolavirus (EBOV), which is a part of the family Filoviridae, and for the disease that they cause, Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The virus is named after the Ebola River, where the first recognized outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred. The viruses are characterized by long filaments, and have a shape similar to that of the Marburg virus, also in the family Filoviridae, and possessing similar disease symptoms.

There are a number of species within the ebolavirus genus, which in turn have a number of specific strains or serotypes. The Zaïre virus is the type species, which is also the first discovered and the most lethal. Ebola is transmitted primarily through bodily fluids and to a limited extent through skin and mucous membrane contact. The virus interferes with the endothelial cells lining the interior surface of blood vessels and platelet cells. As the blood vessel walls become damaged and the platelets are unable to coagulate, patients succumb to hypovolemic shock.

Ebola first emerged in 1976 in Zaire. It remained largely obscure until 1989 with a widely publicized outbreak in Reston, Virginia.

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